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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel has launched new air strikes into syria. u.s. security officials say the attack came after nightfall, in the syrian port city of latakia after nightfall. the target was said to be russian-made, surface-to-ai
and probably don't like his anti-russian foreign policy. >> they were looking for a change, but we do have a new man looking to pursue close ties with russia and the west. do you think that dual course is possible? >> well, i think that mikheil saakashvili will have to choose. he may not be loyal to rushe splittic -- russia politically. he'll continue his own foreign policy. he's been manoeuvring between russia and the west. if he's serious about joining the european union, they will require him to worsen relations with russia. that happened with ukraine. i don't see how it will be avoided by georgia. >> you think he'll have to choose, he can't pursue both tracks? >> if the foreign policy of the european union changes, and sees russia as a threat tore competitor, it will be a very happy one for everyone, because then georgia will be able to develop close ties with russia and the rest of europe. right now the stans of the european union is anti-rush j. and the media. >> what overtures will russia make to the new leadership to try to improve ties? >> already tourism started between russia an
on foreign policy you're seeing a robust left presence. i want to go back. i think the more interesting thing here is the new coalitions forming. when you see code pink and freedom work joining together for a rally. >> that means the world is over. >> that means america has to is the up and take notice we're doing something really troubling. hopefully the president will show leadership and take accountability for it. >> in a weird way not everything has to be partisan. >> lets not go too crazy. >> not get ahead of ourselves. waiting for president obama to speak at the welcoming ceremony for new fbi director james comey. >>> former vice president dick cheney cast in a new light. we will discuss cheney doctrine and peter baker's incredibly awesome new book next on "now." ready to run your lines? okay, who helps you focus on your recovery? yo, yo, yo. aflac. wow. [ under his breath ] that was horrible. pays you cash when you're sick or hurt? [ japanese accent ] aflac. love it. [ under his breath ] hate it. helps you focus on getting back to normal? [ as a southern belle ] aflac. [ as a cowboy ]
and all the indian country to fully incorporate the standards into foreign policy. >> i have a second part dealing with the global policy. with the united nations declaration is that a factor in the role of the united states diplomacy with global humanitarian issues? >> yes. i think it is very important because foreign policy is based on human rights as president eisenhower said up -- whatever america once in the world the past to take place in its own backyard. it is important we want to use human rights as a foreign policy tool to take care of this legacy of conquest here at home. i am from oklahoma they don't like the u.n. or international law but as long as we are a member nation of the united nations to promote human rights in always running to the un whenever we tried to do humanitarian int to do humanitarian intervention or a call or punishment with the war against syria we go to you when we are still a member in this declaration they expect them to pay heed that is a new order of the day and ultimately our nation will extend the human-rights just like the world has abolished slaver
of the region, the last measure of american foreign policy should be how it is received by the house. if there were a price for most irresponsible foreign policy, it would be surely be awarded to saudi arabia. it is the nation most responsible for the rise of islamic radicalism and militancy across the world. over the past four decades, the kingdoms immense oil wealth has been used to underwrite the export of an extreme intolerant and violent version of islam. go anywhere in the world from germany to indonesia and you will find islamic centers flush with saudi money spouting intolerance and hate. a top treasury official said -- >> if i could snap my fingers and cut off funding from one country, it would be saudi arabia. >> hillary clinton confirmed that saudi arabia remained a critical financial base for terrorism. she also said that there was only limited action to stop flow of funds from taliban and other such terrorists groups. saudi arabia was one of three countries in the world to recognize and support the taliban-led government in afghanistan until the 9/11 attacks. it is also
american foreign policy. plus the influence of rock legend lou reed and his impact on the culture from the 60s to today. >> hello, i'm libby casey. tonight on inside story we'll take a walk on the wild side and look at the life and legacy of iconic rocker lou reed who died at the age of 71. first we'll focus on american spying, specifically spying on friends, and our friends are not happy. tonight you can add spain to the list of countries that are demanding answers. the newest details emerge in this spanish newspaper "el mundo" reporting that phone calls from surveye survei. over the weekend came news that the nsa has been monitoring calls from german chancellor angela merkel as far back a as 2002. >> i think the most important thing is to find a basis for the future on which we can operate, and as i said today trust needs to be rebuilt which implies that trust has been severely shaken, and the members of the european union share these concerns today. true change is necessary. >> reporter: when barack obama was running for president in 2008 he went to german and pledged a new era of u
outer liberal economic policies and probably they don't like he is anti-russian foreign policy and at a certain moment he will have to choose because, yes, he made the capitol in russia but he will continue his own foreign policy and so far he has been maneuvering between russia and the west. but if he is serious about joining the european union or having associate membership, the union will require him to worsen relations with russia and that happened to ukraine and not avoided by georgia. >> in the uk the defunct news of the world newspaper rebecca brooks and kandi corazon are in court to stand trial on phone hacking charges so let's go to roy who is outside of the court in london and tell us what is going to happen, roary. >> reporter: david, this starts with a bang on the first day is mostly procedural so we are likely to see the swearing in of the jury and we will get an outline really of how the trial is going to proceed. we won't actually have much of the nitty gritty of the trial or evidence or anything like that on the first day. we will see the defendants in court. 8
is the embargo still in place? >> well, it's hard to think about more counter productive foreign policy than the u.s. embargo. here we have 180 plus nations in the united nations voting against a country who's supposedly the beacon of liberty around the world in favor of a ruthless brutal dictatorship because of the the embargo. i cannot think of a policy that has served the opposite purpose of the goal towards cuba. i mean, after 50 years of the embargo in place, cuba is not any closer to becoming a democracy than in 1960, so i think it's pretty clear that it is an utter failure. >> this is the 22nd year in a row the u.n. voted on this issue. last year, three voted in favor of the sufficient, this year only two, israel being the second. is the u.s. growing more and more isolated on this issue and what does it signal? >> the tiny island of paolo was the other country that voted last year in favor of the united states. i think the embargo is quite the useful tool for the cuban regime. look at what's going on. it helps the cuban regime to rally the entire world behind them and against the unit
strategy in the iranian foreign policy. the essential question is did sanctions work? >> it's difficult to come up with an explanation as to why it is in the presidential elections six of the seven candidates criticized the previous negotiator. unless there was some impact sanctions were having on the debate in iran. it's difficult to see why it is his focus on the economy would have been so successful unless the sanctions were having some impact in iran's economy. it's difficult to see why it is that after several years which iran seemed entirely uninterested in a nuclear deal we have a new nuclear negotiating team that is obviously interested in reaching a deal as quickly as possible. unless the sanctions were having some impact on iran. and i think one of the people whose opinion we should listen to in the matter is mr. -- who said repeatedly the sanction we're having a dramatic impact on iran. and it change and approach was necessary. so from the perspective of the obama administration, -- as i have written several monograph. the obama team from the beginning always thought the sanc
, you would probably be upset, you could understand it at some level because spying is part of foreign policy, but you are a human being and you would be ticked off and she is. >> united states is not the only country that spies on world leaders. madeline albright said that once she was at the united nations and said. >> rick: a french are ambassador asked her about something she said on a phone call. this is not unusual that people spy. >> a group of soldiers in mosl, injured more than 150, it raises this month's death toll to 545 people killed. a surge in sectarian violence has killed more than 500,000 people around iraq. >>> in line with agreement to eliminate all of the weapons by mid 2014. al jazeera's kimberly dukehart has more. >>> syria is meeting an ambitious deadline set by opcew to destroy its lethal stockpile by next year. syria handed over the detail thursday ahead of its october 27th deadline. opcw is not releasing what their report says but it did say the syrian government disclosed 23 chemical weapon sights, the head said last week that the country has so far been coo
, american foreign policy towards syria. the meeting, the deputy prime minister re-engagement with elements of the assad regime and shows americans deep involved and engagement in pushing for a political settlement inside syria. interesting developments there. i want to move on and talk about the meeting between peace envoy lakhdar brahimi, who was expected to hold talks with president assad. lakhdar brahimi says he has seen assad playing a role in a new syria, but not as a leader. do you think this is something assad is likely to agree to? >> not at all. in fact, not only assad would not agree to what mr lakhdar brahimi publicly stated, lakhdar brahimi yesterday tried to distance himself from his own announcement on syrian television, saying the statement was taken out of context. president assad warned lakhdar brahimi to stay faithful to his mission, not to make any statements outside of his mission. the reality is that there is a stalemate in the syrian crisis. the reality is the syrian opposition is divided. the assad regime is not going to make a compromise or really give the oppositio
it sooner? in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you also have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? and now we find ourselves in a situation where fighting on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance is harder than ever and may be impossible. why did we do this, but sooner? -- why did we not do this, but sooner? it is harder than ever and might be impossible. >> the syrian opposition from the beginning was atomized. that is how it survived the regime's oppression. there was no national leadership. it is very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you are right, we only recognized it in december, 2012. but it was only formed in mid- november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. we have reduced the syrian embassy to the officer. and frankly, that officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want a syrian task force and he is able --
is my question. sooner?'t we do it in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you also have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? and now we find ourselves in a situation where fighting on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance is harder than ever and may be impossible. why did we do this, but sooner? -- why did we not do this, but sooner? >> the syrian opposition from the beginning was atomized. that is how it survived the regime's oppression. there was no national leadership. it is very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you are right, we only recognized it in december, 2012. but it was only formed in mid- november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. we have reduced the syrian to the officer. and frankly, that officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want a syrian task force and he is able to issue them. if i may continue,
the domain of foreign policy, whether the central government is on board because the prime minister of pakistan is going to be briefed by his cabinet in the next few hours and is going to be some sort of outcome from that particular meeting with the prime minister later tonight. >> we will continue to follow that, and thank you. elections turn violent sunday in parts of kosovo and masked men burst in throwing tear gas and smashing ballot boxes and the police were across the city and the first time they are voting in local elections since they declared independence in 2008. when the storm season calms and dangerous exit begins and 50 people are missing after a boat capsized and eight people were rescued and carrying muslims and they are a muslim minority in myanmar and persecuted and 200 people have been killed in violence and hundreds in camps and they tried to flee the country. east of the bay another boat accident killed at least six tourists, a boat capsized and it was over crowded and took on water and sank. the capacity is 150 but there have been more than 200 on board. witness
formulate an effective foreign and national security policy. we're looking for that. so we're looking for information that helps us -- >>. >> ifill: that's pretty broad though. >> of course it's broad. we're looking for information that help us understand how other countries think and how they plan to operate. and that can make our relationship with them much more affective and productive. >> ifill: is that what european nations are looking for as well? >> i think that european nations it are looking for some supervision and some limits. the nsa sucks in as much information as it does partly because it can. partly because of new information technologies, the internet, wireless, cell phones. and the europeans simply have a political culture that is more sensitive to privacy than in the united states. >> ifill: so they handle their intelligence differently than we would necessarily. >> well, they haven't made much more progress on these kinds of issues among themselves than they have with us. they don't have an eu-wide approach to intelligence. they have their individual member states b
an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the united states. therefore i have determined that it is necessary to continue the national emergency declared with respect to sudan and maintain and enforce the sanctions against sudan to respond to this threat. signed, barack obama, the white house, october 30, 2013. the speaker pro tempore: the message will be referred to the committee on foreign affairs and ordered printed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. gohmert: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today, it adjourn to meet at 10:00 a.m. on friday, november 1, 2013, unless it has received a message from the senate transmitting its concurrence in the house concurrent resolution 62, in which case the house shall stand adjourned pursuant to that concurrent resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. gohmert: pursuant to the order of the house today, mr. speaker, i move that the house do now hereby adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjo
intelligence or suspected foreign agents. >> one major point was made to surveillance policies, saying everybody else is doing it too. they claim some of the information came from nato allies, not u.s. spying. greece has admitted to spying on the u.s. and others in the 1990's at the hearing. james clapper made it clear the u.s. is in good company. >> you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence service leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> he said the white house was aware the n.s.a. oversees eavesdropping all along, but may not have known specifics. >> russian leaders denying reports of spying on overseas leaders. they are accused of passing out bugged gift bags at last months g-20 summit. the report by two italian newspapers say delegates were given memory sticks and phone chargers equipped with spyware. it's unclear how many leaders received the bags or used the free bees. >> edward snowden can earn a ticket out of russia if he testifies about spying. germany are investigating report
or public in on the senate foreign relations committee said today that he is embarrassed by the obama administration's policy on syria and a lack of support to the syrian opposition. bob corker was addressing the ambassador to syria at this hearing. it includes an update on efforts to transfer syria's chemical weapons to international control. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> this hearing of the senate foreign relations on syria will come to order. we have two panels today. first panel is robert ford, ambassador to syria, the assistant administrator for the bureau of democracy atu assistant for international security and nonproliferation. our second panel we will have alabaster -- an ambassador for the center of the atlantic council. we welcome you all. i look forward in this hearing to hear your respective on the realities we face in syria, the state of play, the progress we have made, and where we go from here strategically, especially given the catastrophic human a tearing crisis that is spreading a
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)